Tragus Piercing

Tragus Piercing Tragus piercings are quite common and they were first made popular by the piercer Luis Garcia. The piercing is done horizontally in the front of the ear canal. The jewellery that is worn with these piercings is quite small.

The piercer has to be careful when they are performing a tragus piercing as they need to avoid entering the aural canal. In order to avoid this they use a small needle and it is sent straight into a cork that is put behind the tragus as the ear is being pierced.

What Does a Tragus Piercing Involve?

Most people do not experience pain during a tragus piercing. This is because there are no nerve endings in the tragus. However, some people do report feeling a little pain so it will differ from person to person. You may also find that once the piercing has been done, bleeding can occur for up to an hour afterwards. When it comes to wiping away the blood, always ensure that you do not use a fabric cloth. This is because fabric cloths tend to have quite a lot of bacteria collected on them.

Just like with any other piercing, it is always a good idea to provide some aftercare to help the piercing to heal. Using a little antibacterial soap on the piercing every time that you shower will really help to keep the area clean. Also drying the piercing with a disposable tissue will also help to protect it.

The tragus piercing should not interfere with your hearing and it is not known to cause any problems for the face either. Many people love the way that the piercing looks and it will certainly get you noticed. Whilst you are having the piercing done you will experience a popping sound which many people have reported to be quite strange. However in some ways the sound takes your attention away from the discomfort caused by the piercing.

Overall the tragus piercing is easy to look after, it looks good and there is very little pain involved. Most people can have this type of piercing and as long as you follow simple aftercare instructions you should experience now problems at all with this type of ear piercing!

Body Piercing Infection – What You Must Know

Body Piercing Infection

When you’re getting a body piercing, you must avoid certain actions to minimize the risk of getting a body piercing infection.
Actually there are three main types of body piercing infection you can get, not only one!

The first and the most common bugs you can get are some bacterial infections like Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. If you get one of these and the fresh piercing is really infected – painful, swollen and oozing yellow pus, your doctor will most likely prescribe antibiotics to kill the bacteria.

Actually it’s been reported that around 10 – 20% of all body piercings result in a small body piercing infections, so if your fresh body piercing is just slightly reddish and a bit tender to touch – most likely it’s going to pass within a few days.

The second type of body piercing infection is viral infections like hepatitis B and hepatitis C. This piercing infection can be transmitted to your body if the piercing instruments haven’t been properly sterilized. Using a disposable piercing needle is a must, and the piece of body jewelry that is inserted into your fresh piercing needs to be sterilized.

This is why it’s very important to make sure that the piercing studio is of the highest standards and the possibility of getting hepatitis is reduced to a minimum. If you have any doubts when entering the studio and talking to the guy or girl who’s going to pierce you – better leave the place and look for another one.

It would be really silly to get a viral infection when such diseases can be easily avoided by making sure all the health standards are met! So don’t hesitate to ask your piercer if he’s going to use a disposable piercing needle prior to getting pierced.

Another type of a possible body piercing infection includes parasites and other microorganisms. This may happen if you go swimming during the healing period in outdoor waters like seas, lakes and rivers.
So you are advised to avoid going into waters where microorganisms are living. Indoor swimming pools don’t pose such a threat due to chlorine added to water, but I guess you should avoid getting into the pool at least the first week or so after the piercing.